Tag Archive cabbage

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Welsh Onions, Bolting Potato Onions and Cabbage Cuttings

VerdantThe back garden is looking verdant, June is probably the prettiest time, at least in my garden. It is of course not the most productive as far as veggies are concerned but the flowers and overwintered perennial vegetables are being productive. The skirret are looking huge, well the greenery up top is, god knows what the edible tubers look like size wise. One unexpected star is the Welsh Onion/Japanese Bunching Onion. The Japanese ones, well varieties, are selections from the humble Welsh Onion and some of them are as big as leeks, but I can’t really tell the difference. I’m really impressed with them. I started growing them last year and I have cropped them several times. They are perennial and propagate by seed or by dividing, much like chives. Unlike chives Welsh Onions are biggish spring onions with thick and tender shanks you can cut fine for sauces and cut long ways for putting into salads. I got a little dismayed this spring when they put up flower stalks – I thought these inedible hard stalks would ruin the onion – but once I had removed the flower heads the plants divided again separating out the hard flower stalk which I felled. I then continued to cut the onion shanks, one centimetre above the ground and already they are growing back. Read More

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Cabbage Experiment (Mixed Results So Far), Potato Onions and Brassica Cuttings

I’ve spent quite a bit of time (nearly a year now) on one of my favourite experiments. According to Bill Mollison (one of the two founders of permaculture) you can grow a cabbage, chop its head off, watch 4 or 5 new small cabbage heads appear where the main one once was and then remove them, bung them in the soil and grow new cabbages. Well, I set about confirming this (what appears to be a little dodgy) information by trying it out, in reality, in my back garden. I choppped the heads off two of my greyhound cabbages, waited for multiple small ones to regrow and removed them carefully using my thumbnail to get in right up against the main stalk of the plant. From previous experience taking cuttings from perennial kales & kailaan I know it is at this point that roots will grow, where the cutting meets the main stalk. Read More

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Taking Cuttings from Cabbage

Cloned cabbageI am posting this article to collect in one place all the information I have on taking cuttings (or cloning) the humble cabbage. It is a physical experiment I am conducting based on a sentence in a permaculture book. That book said that once you had cut the head of a cabbage you could wait for smaller ones to grow then replant them in the soil for new cabbages. This seems a handy technique for those of us who would rather spend nothing than waste good money on seed. If you add up the price of all the seed packets you buy each year it really adds up. And for us sustainability freaks, we really want to beat the greengrocer. Read More

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Happy 4th Birthday “Dwarf” Green Curly Kale Plus Asturian Tree Cabbage “Broccolis”

Asturian Tree CabbagePicked some “broccoli” from the allotment and fried it with an egg. It was nice but it wasn’t strictly speaking a broccoli but the flowering shoot of an Asturian Tree Cabbage which is both good looking and tasty. It is also a perennial and even though it is starting to flower is not showing any of the smaller leaves normally found on flowering brassicas. Like many brassicas it can be kept alive for more than two years by removing all the flowering shoots but the flowering shoots of the Asturian Tree Cabbage are much larger than most brassicas that are not broccolis. I am growing the ATC for its thick cabbage like leaves (though it doesn’t form a head) and the good quality flowering shoots are a real surprise to me. There are other smaller side shoots so I hope to get lots more as the spring progresses. Read More

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A Spring Start in the Back Garden

Another good day in the back yard and what beautiful spring weather. I may be tempting fate but Spring seems to have arrived a month earlier than last year. Seeds are germinating and herbaceous perennials are popping their heads up out of the ground. I have been busy removing the mulch in the back garden, the reason being my number one enemy (the slug) thrives under vegetative rubbish and also because I want the soil to warm up and mulch can delay the soil warming. I’m not going to compost it though, I am going to continue its use as mulch both for preserving moisture for my potted plants and for progressive mulching for potatoes. Read More

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Vegetative Propagation of Cabbages (Taking Cuttings) [updated]

IMAG0791 copyAs reported previously I have put a lot of effort into reproducing my plants without using seeds. Seeds are uncertain, tricky and prone to being wiped out by slugs and damping off. They also cost money and time. With such things as broccoli and kale I can simply pull off a sprout from the main stalk and bung it in some compost. Cabbages don’t have sprouts like this but will grow sprouts if you cut the main head off. This is well known as a technique to get a second harvest but not as a means of taking cuttings. Read More

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Striking cuttings from cabbages and a visit to Jekka’s Herb Farm

Rooted cabbage cutting (Greyhound)More experimentation has yielded results!. Well confirmed another’s research which is just as good. You’ll read such interesting sentences in permaculture books as “cut the head of a cabbage and when new heads appear replant them”. And then you think to yourself – what really?. Well, I tried it and it has worked, as confirmed by the photo to the left. I cut the head from one of my cabbages, ate it with my in-laws and let the stump resprout about half a dozen mini cabbage heads which I pulled off the stump and bunged in pots of compost. I then smashed the stumps with hammers, threw them on the compost heap and waited for the mini cabbages to sprout roots. With much scepticism I might add. Read More

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